Sunday, October 3, 2010

Blossom

'Flower', says Mira, my two year old granddaughter, pointing at her floral hairclip. Then 'flower', she says again, pointing out the window.  I look out and discover the most glorious sight in my son's garden: a fulsome mass of delicate pink, like a young girl spreading her ballet skirts, all ready to curtsey. There it stands, a flowering cherry tree, rising out of the long grass.
'Blossom!' I exclaim. 'Lots of flowers. It's a blossom tree'.
'Blossom,' says Mira, trying out this new word. And I think what a beautiful word it is. Then I ponder on the difference between a flower and a blossom. The dictionary, ever technical and accurate, tells me that blossom means flower or bloom, especially of a fruit bearing plant. Blossom also means to begin to thrive or flourish.
When I look at the blossom tree, I think of youth, hope and beauty. I think of the wonder of youth, when the whole world seems to be frothy and full of life. I think of opening to life.  I believe in romance. I feel my heart bloom into another season of hope.

4 comments:

Joan said...

A lovely reflection on blossoms. Isn't it lovely too seeing the world through the eyes of a two year old. Blossom is a lovely word. It has a fullness, that suits it's meaning.

lifeonthecutoff said...

Beautiful!
Blossom is sweeter than flower, I think, and how lovely that Mira knows both words now. Your words are wonderful and I can just see your son's garden curtseying.

Marilyn said...

I love the frothiness of spring, all the frou frou of blossom; the word flower to me doesn't convey the wonder that blossom does.

juliet said...

Thank you Joan, Penny and Marilyn for your thoughts about 'blossom'. I love those words 'frou frou' Marilyn! Yes, wonder and fullness and sweetness: each of you has added something to help the blossom open up a little more.